Sony’s Shuhei Yoshida Looks To Fans For PS4 Feedback And Ideas

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The PS4 hasn’t suffered from a lack of updates over the course of its lifespan so far, but most of them have been aimed at increasing stability or fixing existing problems with the system’s architecture and software. Last year, despite releasing over 20 updates for the system, only a small handful actually added new features; the rest fixed performance issues, closed security loopholes, or made “improvements” to features already in place. It took Sony 17 months just to add suspend/resume functionality to the console, despite its absence having long become something of a joke on the internet.

That looks like it might change, however. Sony executive and conductor of internal games development, Shuhei Yoshida, has a request of his loyal fans. Taking to Twitter, he announced that the company is seeking input and ideas for future PlayStation 4 features and improvements.

Shuhei is also looking for feedback on the virtual reality task Sony is working on: Project Morpheus. Much is still unknown about Morpheus, such as a release window and price point, though Yoshida said the price will make the headset available for “as low as possibly can be done.”

Along with his Microsoft counterpart Phil Spencer, Shuhei works with the fans and community on a regular basis to gather feedback from players about how Sony’s latest home console is faring. Shuhei stated that all requests should be directed to his partner Toshimasa Aoki, who can also be found on Twitter.

Aoki has already started responding to people’s suggestions and thoughts on system features.  Uncompressed screenshot support may seem minor, but that’s not the case for some PlayStation users. When taking a screenshot on the PS4, it saves the image as a compressed JPEG file. For some, the compression means that the final quality of the image isn’t up to snuff. Many would instead prefer the system gave the option of saving screenshots as uncompressed PNG files, which typically take up greater space but results in overall higher-quality images.

Aoki replied to the concerns saying he’s look into the problems at hand.

There’s no specific mention of what the team is currently planning on bringing to the PS4 in the near future, and neither Yoshida or Aoki would give much away about what’s on the horizon. Typically, Sony doesn’t reveal the content of its updates until shortly before release, presumably so as to ensure they don’t commit to something which ends up taking more time than originally expected. But Yoshida and Aoki’s comments at least show that the company is open to suggestions and actively listening to what its fans want to see.

What improvements would you like to see come to PS4? Let us know in the comments below.

Tim Jarvis

Tim Jarvis

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Tim hails from Massachusetts, and has an undying passion for videogames and writing. Also a lover of anything and everything nerdy. Movie buff, music enthusiast, internet user, sports fan, tech junky, history/politics aficionado. Beyond!
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